World of Chabad Lubavitch Chabad of Central New Jersey
 
Friday, December 6, 2019 - 8 Kislev 5780
 
About us | Donate | Contact us
The Rebbe
News & Events
Weekly Torah Portion
Magazine
Holidays
Torah Study
Ask The Rabbi
Jewish Calendar
Upcoming Events
Birthday & Yartzeit
Find a Chabad Center
Audio
Videos
Photo Gallery
Event Hall
Campus Housing
Kosher Dining Service
Camp Gan Israel
Mikvah
Arrange for Kaddish
Links
About Us
Contact Us
 
Email EMAIL UPDATES
Join our e-mail list
& get all the latest news & updates
 
Email CANDLE LIGHTING
4:13 PM in New Brunswick, NJ
Shabbat Ends 5:16 PM
Friday, 6 Dec 2019
Parashat 
»   Get Shabbat Times for your area
 
 
Email DONATE
Help support Chabad of Central New Jersey by making a donation. Donate today!
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share |
Anti-Rejection
by Prof. Yirmiyahu Branover

Tissue engineering is a field of biotechnological research that seeks to develop products for transplant, beginning with clusters of cells, to tissues complete with blood vessels and even whole organs. What is unique about this technique is that the cells developed for implant are taken from the transplantee himself, and thus there is no risk of rejection. Rejection is always a risk with transplantation or infusion of "spare parts" not from the recipient.

 

In spiritual terms, the concept of "rejection" also applies. We do not reject that which we recognize as being familiar, belonging to us. However, we do have a tendency to reject one another, to refuse to accept anything that is viewed as foreign, strange. The very "foreignness" of a new concept or new person is interpreted as a threat to our own wellbeing. We tend to reject anything that is seen as intruding on our own space.

 

This defense mechanism serves a purpose as long as we are talking about entities that are an actual threat. But it becomes destructive when the "intrusion" is actually an attempt to help, by supplying us with something we need to sustain life. For example, sometimes we are offered information that could potentially heal or even save a life--as long as we are willing to accept it with an open mind.

 

Every time two Jews meet, there should be an attempt to transmit something that will be of value to the other person: Caring, sympathy, identification, love. The big obstacle to this is the fact that we generally find it difficult to relate to the other person as part of ourselves, part of our own being. His life, his ideas, his habits, seem strange to us, and thus we reject him. However, if we would look at our lives objectively, we would see that we share many of the same weaknesses, needs, concerns. Perhaps if we faced the same challenges as the other person we would not handle them any better than he does. We share one soul, an actual part of G-d above.

 

Thinking along these lines leads to compassion, giving, sharing and understanding. When we recognize in ourselves that we could potentially be just like the other person--there is no room for rejection. Both the donor and recipient benefit when each one shares and gives to the other. An individual is not like a single-celled organism, dependent only on itself for existence, but rather is part of a multi-celled, multi-organ body--we all have a unique role to play and each person is essential for the health of the entire body.

 

Taking this approach leads to optimal health, both physically and spiritually. It also hastens the ultimate Redemption, when a spirit of complete harmony will reign in the world.


Tissue engineering is a field of biotechnological research that seeks to develop products for transplant, beginning with clusters of cells, to tissues complete with blood vessels and even whole organs. What is unique about this technique is that the cells developed for implant are taken from the transplantee himself, and thus there is no risk of rejection. Rejection is always a risk with transplantation or infusion of "spare parts" not from the recipient.

 

In spiritual terms, the concept of "rejection" also applies. We do not reject that which we recognize as being familiar, belonging to us. However, we do have a tendency to reject one another, to refuse to accept anything that is viewed as foreign, strange. The very "foreignness" of a new concept or new person is interpreted as a threat to our own wellbeing. We tend to reject anything that is seen as intruding on our own space.

 

This defense mechanism serves a purpose as long as we are talking about entities that are an actual threat. But it becomes destructive when the "intrusion" is actually an attempt to help, by supplying us with something we need to sustain life. For example, sometimes we are offered information that could potentially heal or even save a life--as long as we are willing to accept it with an open mind.

 

Every time two Jews meet, there should be an attempt to transmit something that will be of value to the other person: Caring, sympathy, identification, love. The big obstacle to this is the fact that we generally find it difficult to relate to the other person as part of ourselves, part of our own being. His life, his ideas, his habits, seem strange to us, and thus we reject him. However, if we would look at our lives objectively, we would see that we share many of the same weaknesses, needs, concerns. Perhaps if we faced the same challenges as the other person we would not handle them any better than he does. We share one soul, an actual part of G-d above.

 

Thinking along these lines leads to compassion, giving, sharing and understanding. When we recognize in ourselves that we could potentially be just like the other person--there is no room for rejection. Both the donor and recipient benefit when each one shares and gives to the other. An individual is not like a single-celled organism, dependent only on itself for existence, but rather is part of a multi-celled, multi-organ body--we all have a unique role to play and each person is essential for the health of the entire body.

 

Taking this approach leads to optimal health, both physically and spiritually. It also hastens the ultimate Redemption, when a spirit of complete harmony will reign in the world.

Prof. Yirmiyahu Branover is chairman of the Center of Magnetohydrodynamic Studies and Training at Ben-Gurion University.

 

 


About us | Donate | Contact us | The Rebbe | News | Parsha | Magazine | Holidays | Questions & Answers | Audio | Video | See mobile site

 
© 2007 Chabad of Central New Jersey. All rights reserved.
 
site designed & powered by Dextel.net